Keto Pasta Noodles

Yes, these noodles real.
Yes, they are low-carb and keto.
Yes, you can cook them.
Yes, you can use your pasta machine.
Yes, they are al-dente.
Yes, they are awesome.

Keto Pasta - Black Tie Kitchen
Yes, that’s real pasta.

Do you need a pasta machine?

You don’t need a pasta machine, but making this pasta with an actual pasta machine is incredibly fun and much easier. There are a ton of good pasta machines on the market, but the one that continually gets the best reviews and remarks (even by America’s Test Kitchen), is the Marcato Atlas 150. If you notice in the video, when I cut the pasta, it doesn’t cut cleanly and I had to pull the noodles apart. That machine wasn’t an Atlas 150. That’s why I currently have my own, in the mail, headed to my door.

If you don’t have a pasta machine, you can roll it out with a rolling pin (a.k.a the old school method). Try to make the dough the same thickness throughout. If it stretches back too much, let it rest for a bit to allow the gluten to relax. To cut the noodles, use a sharp knife and cut them at your desired width.

How many net carbs per serving?

Only 2.7g net carbs per serving. So, if you eat the whole thing… it’s a total of 10.8g net carbs.

Are these keto pasta noodles better than the other alternatives?

For classic Italian pasta dishes, these are 100% better than shirataki noodles, zucchini noodles, squash noodles, and Miracle Noodles. Do they require more work? Yes, but it’s absolutely worth it.

Can I substitute the lupin flour?

No – you can’t substitute the lupin flour. I tried all sorts of low-carb flour alternatives. Almond flour didn’t work, coconut flour didn’t work, xanthan gum didn’t work, etc, etc. You can try different variations of lupin flour and wheat gluten, but these two ingredients are required if you want the true pasta feel and flavor.

Cooking Keto Pasta Noodles - Black Tie Kitchen
Cooking Keto Pasta Noodles in boiling water!

Do you have to cook these keto pasta noodles?

Yes, you have to cook them. These noodles are as real as they can be.

How long do I cook the noodles for?

3 minutes – no more, no less. And make sure the water is boiling before you add the keto pasta. If you cook it longer, they attain a very chewy texture (from the gluten). If you cook it any less, they taste raw. 3 minutes. Trust me.

Keto pasta Noodles - Black Tie Kitchen
Such a beautiful color and texture =)

Can you freeze these keto pasta noodles?

Yes! You can freeze these keto pasta noodles for a later date. They cook better if you let them thaw a bit, but you can cook them frozen – but will take about 30 seconds to a minute longer. Whatever you do, don’t try to place them in a vacuum sealed bag – the pressure crushes the noodles into a pasta puck. To freeze, simply place in a zip top bag and place into the freezer.

Can I make different types of noodles with this recipe?

Of course! This dough has unlimited potential when it comes to pasta. It really is incredible!

What can I eat this with?

These noodles would be great with a little olive oil, some parmesan cheese and served along with some delicious Chicken Parmesan! And instead of using shirataki noodles, you could use these noodles to make Keto Carbonara!

Keto Pasta - Black Tie Kitchen

Keto Pasta Noodles

Yield: 4 servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 3 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 48 minutes

Yes, these are real. Yes, they are low-carb and keto. Yes, you can cook them. Yes, you can use your pasta machine. Yes, they are al-dente. Yes, they are awesome.

Instructions

  1. Combine the wheat gluten and lupin flower either by hand or in a food processor.
  2. Add the 2 eggs and mix. If the dough is too dry, add a few drops of water.
  3. Sprinkle some oat fiber or lupin flour on your surface and knead the dough until it is consistent and slightly smooth but also stretchy.
  4. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest on the counter at room temperature for at least 30 minutes.
  5. Cut the ball into 4 and roll out into a disc.
  6. Using a pasta machine (or a rolling pin), roll our the dough until it gets to your the thinnest you can get it without it falling apart.
  7. Cut your dough to your desired size (typically 12-16 inches for standard noodle length).


To Cook:

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil and heavily salt - it should taste like sea water.
  2. Cook the noodles for 3 minutes exactly. No more, no less. Trust me - 3 minutes is the perfect time.
  3. Remove and use in whatever you want to use. Ive cooked noodles and eaten them the next day as leftovers =)
  4. Enjoy!

Notes

3 minutes in boiling water. Im not kidding when I say no more and no less!

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Nutrition Information
Yield 4 Serving Size 1 serving
Amount Per Serving Calories 146Total Fat 6.4gSaturated Fat 1.1gCarbohydrates 8.2gNet Carbohydrates 2.7gFiber 5.5gSugar 0.6gProtein 20.6g

Did you make this recipe?

Did you make this? Tag @blacktiekitchen on IG so that I can see!

Keto Pasta Noodles
Yes, that's real pasta.

This Post Has 10 Comments

  1. Avatar
    Nancy Curtis

    (This is written in your narrator voice.) I made these, and have questions. Thinking I was pretty smart, I purchased pasta attachments for my Kitchen Aid stand mixer. This was a good idea. Mixing the ingredients IN the mixer, not so much. I ended up with a sticky, chunky mess instead of a beautiful ball of dough, as happens when I make bread dough with vital wheat gluten. (See Diedre’s Bread. If you’re unfamiliar, here’s the link. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPTcf4Ol0cY&t=8s It’s awesome.) So, rather than toss it and start over, I chose to fight the beast and knead the old fashioned way. I used oat fiber to lessen my pain, but it was still an ordeal. I followed instructions per your video for the rest of the process. For future batches, I will be mixing the dough “the old world Italian mother way.”

    The actual making of the noodles was a blast! Tedious but quite rewarding. I made both fettucini and spaghetti, since I had two beautifully thin wide ribbons of pasta, processed to level 1. (I even disturbed my TV producer/college digital production professor husband from his home office/edit cave to admire my work! He also assisted with the precision timing required for the boil.)

    Here’s where it seems I got off script. The cooked noodles, three minutes no more or less, were not hot or even warm. They were prepared with butter, garlic and freshly grated parmesan cheese. They tasted “grainy.” Too much oat fiber, perhaps? There was a good bit of oat fiber remains in the pasta pot, as well as graininess from the Himalayan sea salt (topic for a different rant, perhaps.) After initial tasting, we popped them in the microwave for 15 seconds. Heat was an improvement.

    I am completely unfamiliar with lupin flour, having used it only once for a Serious Keto tortilla recipe, that seriously gummed up my food processor. Most likely operator error. Could the grainy taste have come from the lupin flour? (I used the same brand that you used.) Does it need a separate spin through the food processor to refine the grain? Did I just use too much oat fiber in the kneading and general noodle preparation? Perhaps I could try using lupin flour or protein isolate for dusting?

    I did a Google search for lupin flour recipes and found another pasta recipe very similar to yours, but using some olive oil and xanthan gum, which I would NOT include due to not requiring any more sticky factor (again, my neophite-ish skill level speaking here).

    I welcome your opinions re my first effort with this promising recipe. Thank you for doing the heavy lifting.

    1. Dennis
      Dennis

      Nancy – I know we talked about this in another channel – it’s a really weird situation. One thing I’ve notices is that oat fiber can bring about a graininess factor. It seems like somehow your dough was too wet for some reason – and in testing, this dough can be rather finicky. As little as 2 ml of water can drastically change how the dough behaves in some instances.

  2. Avatar
    Joanna

    Hey hey! I just discovered the channel and it is absolutely amazing.
    I hate to be this person…but for those boor bastards (like me) who are allergic to gluten… is there a chance chance for having a substitute?
    I had to at least try…

    1. Dennis
      Dennis

      Unfortunately, I haven’t found a good substitute 🙁 I hope to circle back on it as new ingredients are made available and the community as a whole finds new methods of doing things, but for now, I’m sad to say that these would likely be a no go for you.

  3. Avatar
    Gwen Taylor

    These are amazing. Thank you for creating and sharing this recipe. I didn’t get my noodles quite as thin as yours. Next time. Low carb cooking changes today. Very exciting. Lupin flour- the new magic ingredient.

    Your videos are so good.

    1. Dennis
      Dennis

      Thanks! They’re not as simple to get super thin as they are a bit dryer than normal noodle, but, they work either way =)

  4. Avatar
    Cindy Gibson

    I had an Atlas pasta machine from 1980 to 2015. I never used it because I knew it would pack some fat on. I finally gave it to my son. Your pasta made with Lupin flour has me very excited. My Lupin flour is in the mail and I’m hoping my son will let me “borrow” back the Atlas. I’ve been keto since 1975 and you have made it fun again!

    1. Dennis
      Dennis

      Im excited for you to try it! =)

  5. Avatar
    Amy

    Loved the video for this recipe… just really entertaining and well-done! One question on the measurements… using the same brands as in the video (I think), the lupina lupin flour and Anthony’s wheat gluten, their nutrition facts say 1/2 cup would be 60g each. Just wanted to confirm that 80g each per two eggs is correct?

    1. Dennis
      Dennis

      yes, it’s 80g. That’s where the mass vs volume makes a big difference. 20g would be SUBSTANTIAL lol

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